How to play: <em>Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule!</em>How to play: <em>Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule!</em>How to play: <em>Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule!</em>How to play: <em>Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule!</em>How to play: <em>Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule!</em>How to play: <em>Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule!</em>How to play: <em>Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule!</em>How to play: <em>Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule!</em>How to play: <em>Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule!</em>
by in Design, Games

The latest prototype for GDFR! has been sent to the printer, and I can’t wait to get it into the hands of playtesters! Honestly, I can’t wait to get my own hands on a copy to play with my friends, and to sleep soundly with it tucked under my pillow… If you have been wanting to know more about the first game that GAME-O-GAMI is publishing, then this post is for you. Today we reveal the latest version of the game’s rules, written by me (David Luis Sanhueza), which will tell you how to play Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule!

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GDFR! Rules v1.0

Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule! is a card game of rhyme and reason for 1 to 4 players. A gang of mischievous goblins have escaped from the Fairy Circle, and it is up to the players to send them back before they cause trouble! But an ancient spell of rhymes which transforms goblins into fairies and fairies into goblins makes this a trickier task than you might think…

 

The Cards

This game consists of 20 unique cards. Each card has two sides, one representing a goblin, the other representing a fairy. When a card is goblin-side-up, it is called a “Goblin.” When a card is fairy-side-up, it is called a “Fairy.” Cards with stars around the edges are called “Star Cards.”
Each side of a card has one of 4 Symbols, shown in the top-left and bottom-right corners. The Symbols are “Sun”, “Moon”, “Mushroom”, and “Frog”. If a card has a Sun Symbol, then the opposite side always has a Moon Symbol. If a card has a Mushroom Symbol, then the opposite side always has a Frog Symbol.
The names of the Fairies and Goblins are divided into 5 rhyming groups. All names end in one of these five sounds: “oop”, “elly”, “ock”, “our”, “ew”. No two cards share the same combination of Goblin and Fairy rhyming groups. No card has the same rhyming group on both sides.

 

Setting Up The Game

Players sit in a circle and take turns going in clockwise order. All players can see each others’ hands at all times, so there is no secrecy. However, it is against the rules to look at the face-down side of any card once the game has started.
When dealing, all cards in the deck should be goblin-side-up. At the beginning of the game, each player is dealt one random Goblin Star Card. Any un-dealt Goblin Star Cards are then set aside, out of the game. The remaining cards are shuffled, and then each player is dealt 3 more Goblin Cards from the deck, starting with the player to the dealer’s left.
Once each player has 4 Goblins, then 4 Fairies are dealt from the deck to the “Fairy Circle,” in the middle of the play space. All remaining cards are then set aside, out of the game.
Then determine which player goes first.

 

How To Play

1) Add – On each player’s turn, that player must add 1 of his cards to the Fairy Circle. A player can add any 1 of his cards, including a Goblin or a Fairy.

2) Flip – If the names of any cards in the Fairy Circle rhyme with the name on the added card, flip them over: Goblins become Fairies and Fairies become Goblins. The added card does not flip over.

3) Take – After the player finishes flipping the cards over, she must take all cards from the Fairy Circle which match the Symbol of the card she added. (Example: all other Sun Symbol cards when the player added a Sun Symbol card.) The player does not take back the card she added.

Star Cards are special. When a player adds a Star Card to the Fairy Circle, ALL other cards in the Circle are flipped over, regardless if they rhyme with the added card or not. The player then takes all cards with a Symbol that matches the card she added, as usual.

After a player has finished taking cards from the Fairy Circle, the next player starts her turn, going in clockwise order.

The goal of the game is to be the first player with NO Goblins when your turn is over. It is okay if a player has Fairies when his turn is over. As long as he has no Goblins, that player wins!

 

Rules for a 1-Player Game

The rules above are for a 2-4 player game. Goblins Drool, Fairies Rule! can be played by a single player, much like Solitaire. The rules for a 1-Player game stay mostly the same, with a few changes:

Setup

At the beginning of the game, deal yourself one random Goblin Star Card. Any un-dealt Goblin Star Cards are then set aside, out of the game. Shuffle the remaining cards, and then deal yourself 5 more Goblin Cards from the deck. You start with a total of 6 Goblins.
Then deal 6 Fairies from the deck to the “Fairy Circle,” in the middle of the play space. All remaining cards are then set aside, out of the game.

How To Play

1) Add – On each turn, add 1 of your cards to the Fairy Circle. You can add any 1 of your cards, including a Goblin or a Fairy.

2) Flip – All cards in the Fairy Circle which rhyme with the added card are flipped over: Goblins become Fairies and Fairies become Goblins. The added card does not flip over.

3) Take – After you finish flipping the cards over, you must take all cards from the Fairy Circle which match the Symbol of the card you added. (Example: all Frog Symbol cards when you added a Frog Symbol card.) You do not take back the card you added.

Star Cards are special. When you add a Star Card to the Fairy Circle, ALL other cards in the Circle are flipped over, regardless if they rhyme with the added card or not. You then take all cards with a Symbol that matches the card you added, as usual.

The game continues until you have NO Goblins when your turn is over. It is okay if you have Fairies when your turn is over. As long as you have no Goblins, you win! If you give up, then the Goblins will run amok and cause you endless amounts of mischief… You have been warned!

Special Challenge: each time you play, see if you can win in less turns than the time before.

 

Rhyming Guide

Here is the list of Goblin and Fairy names, split up into the 5 rhyming groups:

Dusty Dour,  Nappy Hour,  Needs a Shower,  Cringe and Cower, 
Petal Flower,  Sweet and Sour,  Dewdrop Shower,  Pixie Power

Chicken Pock,  Cobweb Shock,  Cuckoo Clock,  Old Man Sock, 
Candy Rock,  Poppy Smock,  Hickory Dock,  Goldie Lock

Gobble T. Goop,  Dastardly Droop,  Salamander Snoop,  Goblin Soup, 
Lemon Loop,  Rainbow Swoop,  Hula Hoop,  Vanilla Scoop

Earwax Stew,  Spidery Glue,  Full Moon Moo,  O.P. You, 
Baby Blue,  Willow Sue,  Morning Dew,  Penny Clue

Nervous Nelly,  Vermin Vermicelli,  He So Smelly,  Big Big Belly, 
Kokopelli,  Snowflake Shelly,  Lucky O’Kelly,  P.B. and Jelly

 

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Any questions? Picturing how the game plays will be even clearer once we are able to show you what the actual cards look like – including the names and symbols laid on top of the illustrations. If something in the rules seems amiss, confusing, or like a potential typo, please let us know.  And if you know friends and family members who would like to play a game like this, please pass this on to them and help our community grow. 🙂  Ready… set… discuss!

– David

 

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5 Comments Share Leave Reply

5 Comments

  • Charley Sumner

    30/03/2012

    Some thoughts:
    1) Does anything different happen if you add a card but there are no matching symbols? I assume it’s ok and you just end up with one less card in “your hand” (there should be a term for this to go along with the “fairy circle” – perhaps “your hand” is “your fairy house” which has become overrun with goblins)
    2) Corollary to the above question: It sounds like you could win by either having all fairies in “your fairy house” or no cards left thus emptying “your house” of all the goblins, is that correct? I assume so, but it seems worth clarifying.
    3) Given the rhyming nature of the game, players should have to read all of the rhymes aloud as they’re flipping cards in the circle.
    4) Are you allowed to add a (non-star) card to the circle if it doesn’t have any rhyming matches and therefore nothing flips? It seems like it would be ok (nothing flips, and you take cards with the matching symbol), but I’m not sure if it’s in the spirit of the game.
    5) Hard to test without the first batch of test cards, but it feels like it might be possible to end up with an unwinnable 2-player game (not enough matching rhymes/symbols). Have you tested this?
    6) Related to #5: You might want to consider adjusting the number of cards by the number of players? A 4 player game would use 4 cards/player + 4 in the circle, but a 2 or 3 player game could use 5pp + 5 in the circle.
    7) Possible optional rule: If a player forgets to flip a matching rhyming goblin card in the circle, and it’s noticed by another player, they can be forced to take it.

  • Sanhueza

    30/03/2012

    Good questions, Charley. Here are the answers:
    1) Nothing special happens when you add a card which has no matching symbol in the Fairy Circle. You simply get that card out of your hand without having to pick up any new cards in return (which is usually the best possible outcome for your turn.) Hmmm, it might be a good idea to give a name for players’ “hands”, as long as it doesn’t get confusing. “Hand” is a well-known and understood term in card games, so I’m not sure if it would be worth sacrificing that for some extra flavor.
    2) Yes, this is correct. You can win with any number of Fairies in your hand, including none at all, as long as you are the first player to have no more Goblins.
    3) What a fun idea! From playtesting, I’ve found that often happens naturally. Do you think that would increase the educational value of this game by putting it specifically into the rules?
    4) Yes, that is a perfectly legal move. On your turn, you can (and must) add any 1 of your cards to the Circle, regardless of rhymes, symbols, or whether it is a Fairy or Goblin.
    5) 2-player games are actually easier and faster, because of the increased chance of less matching rhymes and symbols. That makes it easier for players to add cards to the Circle without having to take new ones (and having to take new Goblins from the Circle slows you down from winning the game.) 4-player games usually take the longest, because you are playing with all the cards. Still, most rounds don’t last longer than 15 minutes. The Star Cards also help break up any stalemates, because they are board changers.
    6) I did that with the 1-player version, because 4 cards in your hand with 4 in the Circle made it too easy to win quickly. 6pp + 6 cards for a 1-player game works much better. 5pp + 5 for 2-player might work out well, I’ll definitely test that out. Thanks!
    7) Interesting suggestion. Forgetting to flip cards can break the game, so I’d rather just encourage players to pay close attention and remind each other. Especially since young children might not know all the rhymes when they’re starting out.

  • Sanhueza

    03/04/2012

    These rules are also being discussed on BoardGameGeek. Join the discussion with us! 🙂

  • Sanhueza

    17/05/2012
  • Sanhueza

    29/05/2012

    The rules have been updated with a few changes, and with a slick new look (thanks to Chris Kirkman from Game Salute!) You can download them here:
    http://www.gamesalute.com/Springboard/GDFR/GDFR-Rules.pdf

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